Literature review: In vitro bioassays have been successfully applied for water quality testing, especially general cytotoxicity assays and those that are specifically responsive to hormone signalling pathways and genotoxicity. They provide an early warning of the presence of chemicals and account for the combined effects of the many chemicals causing mixture effects in complex environmental samples. The cellular response to oxidative stress is an important part of the cellular defence against chemical insult. However, this mechanism has not yet been addressed in water quality assessment apart from some attempts to directly quantify reactive oxygen species. We close this research gap by demonstrating the applicability of the reporter gene assay AREc32 for water quality testing using water samples from sewage to drinking water.

Collectors
Party Professor Beate Isabella Escher
in vitro bioassays   060101  

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